history of King Eadmund the martyr, and the early years of his Abbey
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history of King Eadmund the martyr, and the early years of his Abbey

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Published by Oxford University Press in London .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Edmund, -- King of East Anglia, -- 841-870.,
  • Great Britain -- History -- Anglo Saxon period, 449-1066 -- Sources.,
  • Great Britain -- Church history -- 449-1066

Book details:

Edition Notes

At head of title: Corpus Christi College, Oxford MS. 197.

StatementEdited by Lord Francis Hervey.
ContributionsHervey, Francis, (Lord), 1846-
Classifications
LC ClassificationsDA150 E2 1929
The Physical Object
Paginationvii, 61 p. :
Number of Pages61
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14087800M

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  Ed­mund the Martyr (also known as St Edmund or Ed­mund of East Anglia, died 20 No­vem­ber ) was king of East An­glia from about until his death. Al­most noth­ing . According to abbo of fleury, his first biographer (c), Edmund was a virtuous king, who was defeated by the Danes. He delivered himself into captivity to save his people. He refused to forswear his faith and was shot with arrows and beheaded at or near Hoxne in Suffolk. Within 40 years he was considered a saint and martyr. Edmund the Martyr (also known as St Edmund or Edmund of East Anglia, died 20 November ) was king of East Anglia from about until his death. Almost nothing is known about Edmund. He is thought to have been of East Anglian origin and was first mentioned in an annal of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, written some years after his death.   Edmund the Martyr, Saint, King of East Anglia, b. about ; d. at Hoxne, Suffolk, Novem The earliest and most reliable accounts represent St. Edmund as descended from the preceding kings of East Anglia, though, according to later legends, he was born at Nuremberg (Germany), son to an otherwise unknown King Alcmund of Saxony.

Kings Edward the Elder and Athelstan encouraged his veneration, and early in the eleventh century a monastery in honor of St. Edmund was founded there, and King Canute () donated lands and freed the abbey from any diocesan control, and so from that time the town and monastery were direct dependencies of Rome.   King Edmund was the man who died, indeed was martyred by the Vikings after enduring a tortuous death which ended in his beheading. He thus became St Edmund and was the England’s original heavenly patron saint for over four hundred years from the early 10th century. Edmund the Martyr. Edmund the Martyr was king of East Anglia from about until his death. Almost nothing is known about Edmund. He is thought to have been of East Anglian origin and was first mentioned in an annal of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, written some years after his death. Eadmund "the Martyr" of East Anglia ( November ) was the King of East Anglia from to , succeeding Aethelweard of East Anglia and preceding Oswald of East Anglia.

  Yet, though in detail his hagiography is suspect, the broad elements for a martyr’s death do exist – Edmund was a Christian king, defeated by a pagan war-leader. What the cult did, and what Ælfric in turn does in the Passio, is take the religious aspect to . The holy and right-believing King Edmund the Martyr was a king and martyr of East Anglia in the ninth century. He succeeded to the throne of East Anglia in as a fourteen year old. He died a martyr's death battling the “Great Heathen Army”, a large army of Vikings that pillaged and conquered much of England in the late ninth century.   Edmund was born in Early accounts and stories provide a cloud over who is his father. The sources considered the most reliable represent Edmund as descended from the preceding kings of East Anglia. When King Ethelweard died in , it was Edmund, while only fourteen years old, who succeeded to the throne.   Edward was soon venerated as a saint and martyr with Æthelred himself championing his brother’s cult, translating Edward’s bones to a new shrine at Shaftesbury Abbey in A grant of that year, in favour of Shaftesbury, stated that the gift was being made to God and to.