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The Dublin guild merchant roll, c.1190-1265

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Published by Dublin Corp. in Dublin .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Dublin (Ireland),
  • Ireland,
  • Dublin

Subjects:

  • Guilds -- Ireland -- Dublin -- History -- Sources,
  • Merchants -- Ireland -- Dublin -- History -- Sources,
  • Dublin (Ireland) -- History -- Sources

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementedited by Philomena Connolly and Geoffrey Martin.
SeriesThe calendar of ancient records of Dublin., 1
ContributionsConnolly, Philomena., Martin, G. H. 1928-
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHD6473.I734 D824 1992
The Physical Object
Paginationxxiv, 159 p. :
Number of Pages159
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL1352562M
ISBN 100946841284
LC Control Number92243297
OCLC/WorldCa26673898

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She was an advocate for the publication of medieval and early modern records in order to bring them to a wider audience and as well as editing The Dublin Guild Merchant Roll , which was published by Dublin Corporation in , she also published Irish Exchequer Payments, (, PRO London) and The Statute Rolls of the Irish Parliament, Richard III to Henry VIII (May ). Her . The international composition of the population of medieval Dublin is very well reflected in its Guild Merchant Roll. While the document itself cannot give more than a glimpse of the town and its trade, it nonetheless provides the historian and the archaeologist with almost names, the majority of which can be dated by the years they entered into the merchant : Patricia Becker. The roll was compiled between and and contains the names of those admitted annually to the merchant guild of Dublin with, for the early years, a record of fines paid on entry. The guild members came primarily from settlements in Ireland, England, Wales and Scotland but also from towns throughout Western Europe, from Scandinavia to Italy. Dublin Guild Merchant Rolls c. - ROLL OF MEMBERS OF THE GUILD MERCHANT OF THE CITY OF DUBLIN, transcribed by Philomena Connolly.

  The original roll Dublin City Libraries and Archive have just put online the Dublin merchant guild rolls, dating from about to These are the records of admission to the merchant guild of Dublin city over that year period, more than 8, entries recording names, occupations, places of origin and (in some cases) fathers’ names. Dublin Guild Merchant Rolls c. - The Dublin Guild Merchant Roll: Help. The Dublin Guild Merchant Roll is written in a mixture of Latin, French and English and the transcript is an exact copy of the original text. Dublin City Council has developed pathways to open up the text and transcript for modern usage, even among those who do not have Latin and French. The Dublin Guild Merchant Roll, c. , Dublin, Dublin Corporation, , [John Gillis], Notes: [A analytical description of the general nature of the parchment membranes employed in the charter and a technical description of the joining method used between each skin.], Book . This guild was founded in by royal charter and was second in order of precedence in the Dublin City Assembly. The grant of arms states that the Dublin guild used the arms of the Merchant Taylors of London but that it had now applied for arms in its own right.

In Dublin, the hill of Garyston (Garristown, near Ashbourne Meath) was also called the hill of Trasse (Trase) in the Book of Howth [Carnew Manuscripts] c. The Dublin Guild Merchant Roll. Henricus de Traci 91/2 Sol (=schillings). An analysis of the Dublin Guild Merchant Roll c.  Becker, Patricia (Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland). Department of History, ) The international composition of the population of medieval Dublin is very well reflected in its Guild Merchant Roll. While the document itself cannot give more than a glimpse of the town and its trade. Dublin City Surveyors – Book of Maps - Dublin City Assembly acted as one of a number of landlords with estates in the city following a policy of leasing its lands to improving tenants. The City Estate was leased to Dublin’s merchant class who built houses, stables, ware-houses and out-buildings on their holdings.   A medieval Dublin musician: Thomas Le Harper Dublin City Archives: Dublin Guild Merchant Roll 6. Grant of land to William Russell Dublin City Archives: White Book of Dublin, 7. The White Book of Dublin The White Book is so- called because it is written on white calf-skin or vellum Grievances of the Common Folk of Dublin dated.